HAU

HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory

As every experienced fieldworker knows, the most difficult task in social anthropological fieldwork is to determine the meaning of a few key words, upon an understanding of which the success of the whole investigation depends. – E. E. Evans-Pritchard

HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory, is an international peer-reviewed, open-access journal which aims to situate ethnography as the prime heuristic of anthropology, and return it to the forefront of conceptual developments in the discipline.

The journal is motivated by the need to reinstate ethnographic theorization in contemporary anthropology as a potent alternative to its 'explanation' or 'contextualization' by philosophical arguments, moves which have resulted in a loss of the discipline’s distinctive theoretical nerve. By drawing out its potential to critically engage and challenge Western cosmological assumptions and conceptual determinations, HAU aims to provide an exciting new arena for evaluating ethnography as a daring enterprise for 'worlding' alien terms and forms of life, by exploiting their potential for rethinking humanity and alterity.

HAU takes its name from Mauss’ Spirit of the Gift, an anthropological concept that derives its theoretical potential precisely from the translational inadequations and equivocations involved in comparing the incomparable. Through their reversibility, such inferential misunderstandings invite us to explore how encounters with alterity occasion the resurgence and revisitation of indigenous knowledge practices. As an online journal, HAU stresses immediacy of publication, allowing for the timely publication and distribution of untimely ideas. Aiming to attract the most daring thinkers in the discipline, regardless of position or background, HAU also places no restriction on further publication of material published by the journal.

HAU welcomes submissions that strengthen ethnographic engagement with received knowledges, and revive the vibrant themes of anthropology through debate and engagement with other disciplines and explore domains held until recently to be the province of economics, philosophy and the natural sciences. Topics addressed by the journal include indigenous ontologies and systems of knowledge, forms of human engagement and relationality, cosmology and myth, magic, witchcraft and sorcery, truth and falsehood, indigenous theories of kinship and relatedness with humans and non-humans, hierarchy, materiality, perception, environment and space, time and temporality, personhood and subjectivity, alternative metaphysics of morality.

Announcements

 

Social Media Intern Program - Call for Applications

 

The Editors of HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory have decided to establish a Social Media Intern Program through which graduate students (with priority given to graduate students from HAU-N.E.T., Network of Ethnographic Theory partner-institutions) can be involved in the journal’s efforts to bring high-quality open-access anthropology to a wide readership.

 
Posted: 2014-04-08 More...
 
More Announcements...

Vol 4, No 2 (2014): Translating worlds:
The epistemological space of translation

Cover Page

Table of Contents

Special Issue - Introduction

William F. Hanks, Carlo Severi
1–16

Special Issue - Articles

William F. Hanks
17–39
Carlo Severi
41–71
Rupert Stasch
73–94
Anne-Christine Taylor
95–118
Alan Rumsey
119–140
Adam Yuet Chau
141–160
Carlos Fausto, Emmanuel de Vienne
161–191

Special Issue - Colloquia

John Leavitt
193–220

Special Issue - Forum

G. E. R. Lloyd
221–235

Book Symposium - How forests think: Toward an anthropology beyond the human (Eduardo Kohn)

César Enrique Giraldo Herrera, Gisli Palsson
237–243
Anand Pandian
245–252
Marisol de la Cadena
253–259
Bruno Latour
261–266
Philippe Descola
267–273
Eduardo Kohn
275–288

Book Symposium - The falling sky: Words of a Yanomami shaman (Davi Kopenawa and Bruce Albert)

Pedro de Niemeyer Cesarino
289–295
Roy Wagner
297–300
Peter Gow
301–309
Emmanuel de Vienne
311–317
Jadran Mimica
319–328
Janice Boddy
329–333
Bruce Albert
335–337

Translations

Denis Vidal
339–368

Reprints

Max Gluckman
369–405