HAU

HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory

HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory, is an international peer-reviewed, partly open-access journal that appears in both digital and print format. It aims to take ethnography as the prime heuristic of anthropology, and return it to the forefront of conceptual developments in the discipline.

The journal is motivated by the desire to reinstate ethnographic theorization in contemporary anthropology as an alternative to explanation or contextualization by philosophical arguments--moves which have resulted in a loss of the discipline's distinctive theoretical nerve. By drawing out anthropology’s potential to critically engage and challenge its own cosmological assumptions and concepts, HAU aims to provide an exciting new arena for evaluating ethnography as a daring enterprise for worlding alien terms and forms of life, exploring  their potential for rethinking humanity, self, and alterity.

HAU takes its name from a Māori concept, whose controversial translations—and the equivocations to which they gave rise—have generated productive theoretical work in anthropology, reminding us that our discipline exists in tension with the incomparable and the untranslatable. Through their reversibility, such inferential misunderstandings invite us to explore how encounters with alterity can render intelligible a range of diverse knowledge practices. In its online version, HAU stresses immediacy of publication, allowing for the timely publication and distribution of untimely ideas. The journal aims to attract the most daring thinkers in the discipline, regardless of position or background.

HAU welcomes submissions that strengthen ethnographic engagement with received knowledges, revive the vibrant themes of anthropology through debate and engagement with other disciplines, and explore domains held until recently to be the province of economics, philosophy, and the sciences. Topics addressed by the journal include, among others, diverse ontologies and epistemologies, forms of human engagement and relationality, cosmology and myth, magic, witchcraft and sorcery, truth and falsehood, science and anti-science, art and aesthetics, theories of kinship and relatedness with humans and non-humans, power, hierarchy, materiality, perception, environment and space, time and temporality, personhood and subjectivity, and the metaphysics of morality and ethics.

Free access journal
The University of Chicago Press publishes one free-access journal: HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory. This model provides one month of free access after the release of each new issue, and then requires a subscription for continuous access to content. All HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory content published from 2011-2017 is open access.

Announcements

 

In memoriam Sally Falk Moore

 

We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Sally Falk Moore on May 2, 2021. An intellectually generous scholar of Africa, her theoretical contributions grew out of her fieldwork among the Chagga in Tanzania. In what was a first, she investigated the interactions between indigenous, colonial, and post-colonial social and legal systems in the context of the new socialism after independence. What, she asked specifically, did state attempts to decolonize mean for kinship, landholding, and law? Through her research, she shifted the study of law from its textual products and debates among legal scholars to its execution and effects in lived time, and demonstrated how “customary law” is not prior to state law but a modern product of this encounter with the state. HAU is honored to have published her final book, Comparing Impossibilities (2016), which includes essays published throughout her long career. We will miss Sally, above the scholarship she inspired and the many students whose lives she touched.

Kriti Kapila, Anne-Christine Taylor, John Borneman, and Carlos D. Londoño Sulkin

Board of Directors, Society for Ethnographic Theory

 
Posted: 2021-07-02 More...
 
More Announcements...

Vol 11, No 2 (2021)

Cover Page

Table of Contents

Editorial Note

Nature itself
Andrew B. Kipnis, Raminder Kaur, Luiz Costa, Mariane C. Ferme
379–386

Special Section: Witnessing environments

Sarah E. Vaughn, Daniel Fisher
387–394
Sally Babidge
395–411
Amy Elizabeth Stambach, Aikande Clement Kwayu
412–427
Nicola Martellozzo
428–444
Maria Salomea Dębińska
445–460
Amelia Moore
461–474
Daniel Fisher
475–490
Jennifer C. Hsieh
491–505
Sarah Vaughn
506–520
Steffen Dalsgaard
521–536
Timothy McLellan
537–550

Articles

Ariel Appel
551–566
Jennie Olofsson
567–578
Mélanie Congretel
579–600
Ross Porter
601–618
Robert P. Weller
619–634
Christopher Santiago
635–659
Michelle MacCarthy
660–674
Beth Sutton
675–692
Donna M. Goldstein, Kira Hall
693–712

Festschrift: Paul Rabinow

Teresa P. R. Caldeira, Stephen J. Collier
713–714
Stephen J. Collier
715–719
Teresa P. R. Caldeira
720–725
Peter Redfield
726–730
Rebecca Lemov
731–734
Andrew Lakoff
735–738
Duana Fullwiley
739–747
Nicolas Langlitz
748–753
Talia Dan-Cohen
754–756
Roy A. Fisher
757–761
Janet Roitman
762–766
Ann Laura Stoler
767–770

Book Symposium - Forgiveness work: Mercy, law, and victims’ rights in Iran (Arzoo Osanloo)

Law, society, and the anthropology of noncontemporaneous contemporary
Milad Odabaei
771–777
The work of uncertainty: Relational aesthetics in contemporary Iran
Setrag Manoukian
778–781
Empathy, solidarity, and the work of law and humanitarianism
Michael G. Peletz
782–787
Sentiment and pragmatics in Teheran
John R. Bowen
788–790
Forgiveness as a technology of the state
Katherine Lemons
791–794
Between justice and goodness
Nada Moumtaz
795–799
Everyday forgiveness: The practice and politics of mercy
Arzoo Osanloo
800–806

Book Symposium - The ethics of space: Homelessness and squatting in urban England (Steph Grohmann)

Risky business: Temporal vulnerabilities in contested spaces
Joshua Burraway
807–812
From ethics to politics
Webb Keane
813–817
But beautiful …
Kim Hopper
818–821
We are unhousing people and so are obliged to rehouse them: The moral economy of squatting
Alan Smart
822–826
Ethics and the spacetime discontinuum
Steph Grohmann
827–832

Book Symposium - Against nature (Lorraine Daston)

Natural relativism in lieu of moral absolutism: On the making of a philosophical anthropologist
Nicolas Langlitz
833–837
Against what?
Philippe Descola
838–841
Beyond order, beyond the human: Unruly socionatures and contested politics
Melissa Leach
842–846
The polyphony of nature
Gonçalo D. Santos
847–851
Ethnography and applied metaphysics
Judith Farquhar
852–855
Nature and its discontents
Lorraine Daston
856–862

Re-currents

Katy Pui Man Chan
863–868
Aarti Sethi
869–876

Lecture

Destroying the negatives: M. N. Srinivas, fire, and photography
Christopher Pinney
877–893