HAU

HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory

HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory, is an international peer-reviewed, partly open-access journal that appears in both digital and print format. It aims to take ethnography as the prime heuristic of anthropology, and return it to the forefront of conceptual developments in the discipline.

The journal is motivated by the desire to reinstate ethnographic theorization in contemporary anthropology as an alternative to explanation or contextualization by philosophical arguments--moves which have resulted in a loss of the discipline's distinctive theoretical nerve. By drawing out anthropology’s potential to critically engage and challenge its own cosmological assumptions and concepts, HAU aims to provide an exciting new arena for evaluating ethnography as a daring enterprise for worlding alien terms and forms of life, exploring  their potential for rethinking humanity, self, and alterity.

HAU takes its name from a Māori concept, whose controversial translations—and the equivocations to which they gave rise—have generated productive theoretical work in anthropology, reminding us that our discipline exists in tension with the incomparable and the untranslatable. Through their reversibility, such inferential misunderstandings invite us to explore how encounters with alterity can render intelligible a range of diverse knowledge practices. In its online version, HAU stresses immediacy of publication, allowing for the timely publication and distribution of untimely ideas. The journal aims to attract the most daring thinkers in the discipline, regardless of position or background.

HAU welcomes submissions that strengthen ethnographic engagement with received knowledges, revive the vibrant themes of anthropology through debate and engagement with other disciplines, and explore domains held until recently to be the province of economics, philosophy, and the sciences. Topics addressed by the journal include, among others, diverse ontologies and epistemologies, forms of human engagement and relationality, cosmology and myth, magic, witchcraft and sorcery, truth and falsehood, science and anti-science, art and aesthetics, theories of kinship and relatedness with humans and non-humans, power, hierarchy, materiality, perception, environment and space, time and temporality, personhood and subjectivity, and the metaphysics of morality and ethics.

Free access journal
The University of Chicago Press publishes one free-access journal: HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory. This model provides one month of free access after the release of each new issue, and then requires a subscription for continuous access to content. All HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory content published from 2011-2017 is open access.

Announcements

 

In memoriam Marshall Sahlins and Paul Rabinow

 

We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Marshall Sahlins and Paul Rabinow, two of our most distinguished contemporary anthropologists. HAU has lost not only two friends but two champions of anthropological theory that grows out of ethnographic engagement—precisely the kind of scholarship HAU promotes. Most recently, Marshall Sahlins contributed to HAU books, co-authoring (with David Graeber) On Kings, a major reconsideration of the power, meaning, and role of this ubiquitous political type in premodern societies. Paul Rabinow (with Anthony Stavrianakis), contributed to a HAU Forum devoted to his work on the anthropology of the contemporary. We will miss Marshall and Paul, above all for their insights and scope and their courage to disagree and advance arguments.

Kriti Kapila, Anne-Christine Taylor, John Borneman, and Carlos D. Londoño Sulkin

Board of Directors, Society for Ethnographic Theory

 
Posted: 2021-04-09 More...
 
More Announcements...

Vol 10, No 3 (2020)

Table of Contents

Editorial Note

Mobilizations around the law, iconoclasm, and the (a)moral
Andrew B. Kipnis, Raminder Kaur, Mariane C. Ferme, Luiz Costa
707–715

Currents: India’s Constitutional Crisis

Raminder Kaur, dyuti a
716–725
Fathima Nizaruddin
726–733
Ravi Sundaram
734–741
Sanjay Srivastava
742–749
Farhana Ibrahim
750–757
dyuti A
758–766
Syed Mohammed Faisal
767–775
Hilal Ahmed
776–785

Research Articles

João Pina-Cabral
786–799
Andreas Lipowsky
800–812
Giuseppe Tateo
813–827
Josh Brahinsky
828–843
Karsten Paerregaard
844–859
Johanneke Kroesbergen-Kamps
860–873
Tomi Bartole
874–889
Neil Armstrong, Peter Agulnik
890–905
Annie McCarthy
906–918

Colloquium: Iconoclasm, Heritage, Restitution

Iconoclasm and the restitution debate
Anna Brus, Michi Knecht, Martin Zillinger
919–927
Z. S. Strother
928–952
Iconoclasm and the restitution of African cultural heritage What role for the communities of owners?
Placide Mumbembele
953–956
Ramon Sarró
957–961
Silvie Memel-Kassi
962–966
Peter Probst
967–971
Syna Ouattara, Irafiala Touré
972–979
Rosalind Morris
980–984
Iconoclasms as sites for the production of knowledge
Z. S. Strother
985–988

Debate: A/Moral Anthropology

Nicolas Langlitz
989–1004
Kristine Van Dinther
1005–1021
Fiona C. Ross
1022–1025
John Borneman
1026–1029
Warning against and experimenting with morality
Nicolas Langlitz
1030–1035
The devil’s in the detail: Consequences, intent, and moral futures in anthropology
Kristine Van Dinther
1036–1041

Forum: Aihwa Ong

Daromir Rudnyckyj, Jerome Whitington
1042–1045
Lisa M. Hoffman
1046–1048
Chris Vasantkumar
1049–1051
Stephen J. Collier
1052–1054
Daromir Rudnyckyj
1055–1057
Michael G. Peletz
1058–1060
Louisa Schein
1061–1063
Damani J. Partridge
1064–1067
Jerry Zee
1068–1070
Alfred Montoya
1071–1073
Jerome Whitington
1074–1077
Andrew Lakoff
1078–1081
Anke Schwittay
1082–1084
Caitlin Zaloom
1085–1087

Book Symposium

Singing a cosmos into being—for silent or argumentative ancestors?
Piers Vitebsky
1088–1093
Death rites as existential inquiry
Jean M. Langford
1094–1098
Ritual action, context and comparison
Carlo Severi
1099–1102
How exceptional are the Lòlop’ò?
Anne E. McLaren
1103–1105
Ritual as theory, theory as ritual
Michael Puett
1106–1108
The rights of the dead
Ryan Schram
1109–1112
Corpses and voices across worlds
Erik Mueggler
1113–1118

Translation

Introduction to “Kinship nomenclatures and kin marriage” by Paul Kirchhoff
Dwight Read
1119–1122
Kinship nomenclatures and kin marriage
Paul Kirchhoff
1123–1144